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2013 Mac Pro Ship Times Improve Incrementally

25 April 2014 373 views 2 Comments

In the ongoing 2013 Mac Pro constrained allocation drama, Apple has shaved a week or two from its estimated delivery times for new orders

In the ongoing 2013 Mac Pro constrained allocation drama, Apple has shaved a week or two from its estimated delivery times for new orders. That’s an improvement over Apple’s advertised five to six weeks from earlier in the month.

“In a change to the Online Apple Store on Thursday, Apple is now quoting Mac Pro shipping availability at three to five weeks for all configurations, suggesting supply of the flagship Mac is finally catching up to demand,” writes AppleInsider.

In the ongoing 2013 Mac Pro constrained allocation drama, Apple has shaved a week or two from its estimated delivery times for new orders

Well, catching up just a teeny little bit. Nevertheless, the Apple has been making steady if slow progress.

However, Apple seems to be favoring some third-party resellers. For example, MacMall lists 24-hour availability for a number of 2013 Mac Pro configurations, including Apple’s baseline $2,999 model.

Folks wanting a traditional cheese grater Apple tower can get a refurbished Mac Pro.

Are you feeling more or less optimistic about the 2013 Mac Pro? Ready to order?

Image WCCF

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2 Comments »

  • fustian said:

    Not interested until there is a 4K monitor to go with it.

    My current Mac Pro is still plenty fast enough, so it’s not like I’m hurting. But access to a 4K monitor would be sweet and make the upgrade worth it.

    My decision would also depend at least partly on how they implement 4K. There are three resolution choices: conference room, monitor, retina.

    The first would be a really large monitor meant for a conference room. Up close you’d see individual pixels.

    Monitor would be larger than the current Mac displays but would have the same dot pitch. This would give you lots of extra screen real estate.

    Retinal would give you the same screen size, but lots more resolution. More like an iPad. But this choice would give you the same screen real estate as current monitors.

    Obviously they should split the difference between monitor and retinal.

  • the rocr (author) said:

    There are lots of 4K monitors, just none with an Apple logo on it, yet…

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